Tag Archives: Richmond Attorney

Virginia Criminal Case FAQ

Virginia Criminal Case Frequently Asked Questions

Our clients present us with many questions related to Virginia criminal cases. Some of these include:

What is the structure and progression of Virginia criminal case?

What is the bond or bail hearing and how do I know if I will get bond?

Should I plea bargain or go trial?

How do I choose a Virginia criminal defense lawyer?

Should I be tried by a judge (bench trial) or by a jury?

Does my prior criminal record matter for purposes of my current Virginia criminal charges?

Should I testify in my Virginia criminal trial?

If I am convicted of a crime in Virginia, what steps do I take to appeal. Can things get worse if I appeal my conviction?

What is a habeas corpus proceeding in Virginia?

How do I choose a Virginia federal crime defense attorney?

What is the structure and progression of Virginia criminal case? [Back to top ]

A Virginia criminal case usually starts when a citizen or a police officer swears out a criminal complaint and affidavit. Frequently the criminal complaint is presented to a magistrate who determines probable cause. For many Virginia misdemeanor criminal complaints, the magistrate, upon finding probable cause, will issue an arrest warrant against the defendant. For other misdemeanor complaints and frequently for felony complaints, the complaint will be forwarded to a police detective for further investigation.

Sometimes the Virginia police detective will contact the suspect and ask him to come to the station to discuss the matter. Sometimes the Virginia police detective will show up at the suspect’s residence to “talk.” If you re contacted by a police detective regarding a pending investigation it is extremely important that you contact a competent Virginia criminal defense attorney before discussing anything with the police, even if the police indicates to you that “no charges are pending” that “I don’t have a warrant” or that “it is better for you to cooperate now or it might get worse.”

Once a detached magistrate finds probable cause that the suspect committed the offense, an arrest warrant will issue. Bear in mind that a finding of probable cause requires only minimal evidence. It is a far cry from guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, the standard required to convict. If a warrant is issued against you, sometimes the police will contact you to voluntarily surrender yourself. Sometimes the police will show up at your home, work, or any other place you frequent for the purpose of arresting you. In either case, it is important that you contact a competent Virginia criminal defense lawyer for legal advice and to protect your rights. It is extremely important that you are prepared to interact with a highly trained police officer who is on a mission to obtain a “statement” from you. This statement will invariably be used as a confession, whether or not you believe that you actually confessed. A mistake here can land you in a Virginia jail or even worse, in a Virginia prison.

After being arrested, booked, and processed, you will be taken to a magistrate for a bail hearing. At this hearing, you will be asked several questions to determine whether you are a flight risk or a danger to the community. For more details about your bond hearing, please refer to our Virginia criminal law frequently asked question regarding bail determinations and bond hearings. If you don’t agree with the magistrate’s bail decision, you may have bail heard by the General District Court or the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court depending on the type of case. The decision of the Virginia General District or Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court can then be appealed to the Circuit Court, then to the Virginia Court of Appeals, and finally, to the Virginia Supreme Court.

What is the bond or bail hearing and how do I know if I will get bond?

Should I plea bargain or go trial? [Back to top ]

During most criminal cases, there will be a time when your Virginia criminal defense lawyer will negotiate with the Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney. The plea bargain process will result in either an agreed disposition of your Virginia criminal case or a decision to go to trial. We can provide you with legal advice to assist you in making the decision of whether to plea bargain or go to trial.

How do I choose a Virginia criminal defense lawyer? [Back to top ]

Should I be tried by a judge (bench trial) or by a jury? [Back to top ]

There are many advantages to a trial by a jury of your Virginia peers. To convict you, the prosecution must be able to convince the jury panel, your faith will not just be in the hands of a Virginia judge. However, a jury can’t suspend any time of the sentence. Our Virginia criminal defense attorneys ma assist you in making the decision of whether to choose to be tried by a Virginia judge or Virginia jury.

Does my prior criminal record matter for purposes of my current Virginia criminal charges? [Back to top ]

Should I testify in my Virginia criminal trial? [Back to top ]

If I am convicted of a crime in Virginia, what steps do I take to appeal. Can things get worse if I appeal my conviction? [Back to top ]

What is a habeas corpus proceeding in Virginia? [Back to top ]

How do I choose a Virginia federal crime defense attorney? [Back to top ]

Contact a Virginia felony defense lawyer

Virginia (VA) criminal defense, divorce, child custody, reckless driving, dui and federal court attorney representing clients throughout Virginia. Some of the jurisdictions served include:

Henrico County VA, Richmond City, Chesterfield County VA, Hanover County VA, Petersburg County VA, Fairfax County, Prince William County, Hopewell, Petersburg, Dinwiddie, Quantico, Virginia Beach VA, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Fredericksburg, Stafford, Spotsylvania VA, Hampton Roads, Newport News, Hampton, Williamsburg, Amelia, Powhatan, Goochland, Louisa, Manassas VA, Woodbridge, Charles City, James City, Gloucester, Tidewater, Portsmouth, Shenandoah, Prince George, Sussex, New Kent, West End of Richmond, Glen Allen, Federal Court for the Eastern District of Virginia (Richmond, Alexandria, Norfolk, and Newport News Divisions).

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Virginia Assault And Battery

Virginia Assault and Battery

Under Virginia law, the common law offenses of assault and battery have been merged. In Virginia, assault and battery are codified under the Code of Virginia.

In Virginia, an assault and battery is an act intended to cause an apprehension of harm or offensive contact. The uttering of words in the absence of an act are not an assault. The words must be accompanied by some act indicating that the accused may actually carry out the threat. Assault also requires that the accused also have the intent to commit the assault. For an assault to occur, the alleged victim must have a reasonable apprehension of imminent injury or imminent unlawful contact.

Assault and battery is a general intent offense. Therefore, the accused does not need to intend the specific harm that will result from the unwanted contact, but only the intent to commit an act of unwanted contact. Gross negligence and recklessness may provide the required intent. If the assault and battery are perpetrated by a mob, each participant can be found guilty of the offense of assault and battery in Virginia.

In Virginia, the traditional defenses for a charge of assault and battery are available. Lack of the intent to commit a Virginia assault and battery and self-defense are the most common defenses to a charge of assault and battery in Virginia.

Under Virginia law, an aggravated offense of assault and battery may be charged as malicious wounding.

Under the Code of Virginia, some assault and battery charges may include:

* Assault and battery
* Assault and battery against a household or family member
* Additional considerations for military personnel convicted of assault and battery in Virginia
* Discretionary civil remedy to assault and battery charges in Virginia – Accord and satisfaction

Assault and battery

§ 18.2-57. Assault and battery.

A. Any person who commits a simple assault or assault and battery shall be guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor, and if the person intentionally selects the person against whom a simple assault is committed because of his race, religious conviction, color or national origin, the penalty upon conviction shall include a term of confinement of at least six months, 30 days of which shall be a mandatory minimum term of confinement.

B. However, if a person intentionally selects the person against whom an assault and battery resulting in bodily injury is committed because of his race, religious conviction, color or national origin, the person shall be guilty of a Class 6 felony, and the penalty upon conviction shall include a term of confinement of at least six months, 30 days of which shall be a mandatory minimum term of confinement.

C. In addition, if any person commits an assault or an assault and battery against another knowing or having reason to know that such other person is a judge, a law-enforcement officer as defined hereinafter, a correctional officer as defined in § 53.1-1, a person employed by the Department of Corrections directly involved in the care, treatment or supervision of inmates in the custody of the Department, a firefighter as defined in § 65.2-102, or a volunteer firefighter or lifesaving or rescue squad member who is a member of a bona fide volunteer fire department or volunteer rescue or emergency medical squad regardless of whether a resolution has been adopted by the governing body of a political subdivision recognizing such firefighters or members as employees, engaged in the performance of his public duties, such person is guilty of a Class 6 felony, and, upon conviction, the sentence of such person shall include a mandatory minimum term of confinement of six months.

Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to affect the right of any person charged with a violation of this section from asserting and presenting evidence in support of any defenses to the charge that may be available under common law.

D. In addition, if any person commits a battery against another knowing or having reason to know that such other person is a full-time or part-time teacher, principal, assistant principal, or guidance counselor of any public or private elementary or secondary school and is engaged in the performance of his duties as such, he shall be guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor and the sentence of such person upon conviction shall include a sentence of 15 days in jail, two days of which shall be a mandatory minimum term of confinement. However, if the offense is committed by use of a firearm or other weapon prohibited on school property pursuant to § 18.2-308.1, the person shall serve a mandatory minimum sentence of confinement of six months.

E. As used in this section:

“Judge” means any justice or judge of a court of record of the Commonwealth including a judge designated under § 17.1-105, a judge under temporary recall under § 17.1-106, or a judge pro tempore under § 17.1-109, any member of the State Corporation Commission, or of the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission, and any judge of a district court of the Commonwealth or any substitute judge of such district court.

“Law-enforcement officer” means any full-time or part-time employee of a police department or sheriff’s office which is part of or administered by the Commonwealth or any political subdivision thereof, who is responsible for the prevention or detection of crime and the enforcement of the penal, traffic or highway laws of this Commonwealth, and any conservation officer of the Department of Conservation and Recreation commissioned pursuant to § 10.1-115, and conservation police officers appointed pursuant to § 29.1-200, and such officer also includes jail officers in local and regional correctional facilities, all deputy sheriffs, whether assigned to law-enforcement duties, court services or local jail responsibilities, auxiliary police officers appointed or provided for pursuant to §§ 15.2-1731 and 15.2-1733 and auxiliary deputy sheriffs appointed pursuant to § 15.2-1603.

“School security officer” means an individual who is employed by the local school board for the purpose of maintaining order and discipline, preventing crime, investigating violations of school board policies and detaining persons violating the law or school board policies on school property, a school bus or at a school-sponsored activity and who is responsible solely for ensuring the safety, security and welfare of all students, faculty and staff in the assigned school.

F. “Simple assault” or “assault and battery” shall not be construed to include the use of, by any teacher, teacher aide, principal, assistant principal, guidance counselor, school security officer, school bus driver or school bus aide, while acting in the course and scope of his official capacity, any of the following: (i) incidental, minor or reasonable physical contact or other actions designed to maintain order and control; (ii) reasonable and necessary force to quell a disturbance or remove a student from the scene of a disturbance that threatens physical injury to persons or damage to property; (iii) reasonable and necessary force to prevent a student from inflicting physical harm on himself; (iv) reasonable and necessary force for self-defense or the defense of others; or (v) reasonable and necessary force to obtain possession of weapons or other dangerous objects or controlled substances or associated paraphernalia that are upon the person of the student or within his control.

In determining whether a person was acting within the exceptions provided in this subsection, due deference shall be given to reasonable judgments that were made by a teacher, teacher aide, principal, assistant principal, guidance counselor, school security officer, school bus driver, or school bus aide at the time of the event.

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Assault and battery against a household or family member

§ 18.2-57.2. Assault and battery against a family or household member; penalty.

A. Any person who commits an assault and battery against a family or household member is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.

B. Upon a conviction for assault and battery against a family or household member, where it is alleged in the warrant, information, or indictment on which a person is convicted, that such person has been previously convicted of two offenses against a family or household member of (i) assault and battery against a family or household member in violation of this section, (ii) malicious wounding in violation of § 18.2-51, (iii) aggravated malicious wounding in violation of § 18.2-51.2, (iv) malicious bodily injury by means of a substance in violation of § 18.2-52, or (v) an offense under the law of any other jurisdiction which has the same elements of any of the above offenses, in any combination, all of which occurred within a period of 20 years, and each of which occurred on a different date, such person is guilty of a Class 6 felony.

C. Whenever a warrant for a violation of this section is issued, the magistrate shall issue an emergency protective order as authorized by § 16.1-253.4, except if the defendant is a minor, an emergency protective order shall not be required.

D. The definition of “family or household member” in § 16.1-228 applies to this section.

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Additional considerations for military personnel convicted of assault and battery in Virginia

§ 18.2-57.4. Reporting findings of assault and battery to military family advocacy representatives.

If any active duty member of the United States Armed Forces is found guilty of a violation of § 18.2-57.2 or § 18.2-57.3, the court shall report the conviction to family advocacy representatives of the United States Armed Forces.

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Discretionary civil remedy to assault and battery charges in Virginia – Accord and satisfaction

§ 19.2-151. Satisfaction and discharge of assault and similar charges.

When a person is in jail or under a recognizance to answer a charge of assault and battery or other misdemeanor, or has been indicted for an assault and battery or other misdemeanor for which there is a remedy by civil action, unless the offense was committed (i) by or upon any law-enforcement officer, (ii) riotously in violation of §§ 18.2-404 to 18.2-407, (iii) against a family or household member in violation of § 18.2-57.2, or (iv) with intent to commit a felony, if the person injured appears before the court which made the commitment or took the recognizance, or before the court in which the indictment is pending, and acknowledges in writing that he has received satisfaction for the injury, the court may, in its discretion, by an order, supersede the commitment, discharge the recognizance, or dismiss the prosecution, upon payment by the defendant of costs accrued to the Commonwealth or any of its officers.

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Contact a Virginia assault and battery defense lawyer

Virginia (VA) criminal defense, divorce, child custody, reckless driving, dui and federal court attorney representing clients throughout Virginia. Some of the jurisdictions served include:

Henrico County VA, Richmond City, Chesterfield County VA, Hanover County VA, Petersburg County VA, Fairfax County, Prince William County, Hopewell, Petersburg, Dinwiddie, Quantico, Virginia Beach VA, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Fredericksburg, Stafford, Spotsylvania VA, Hampton Roads, Newport News, Hampton, Williamsburg, Amelia, Powhatan, Goochland, Louisa, Manassas VA, Woodbridge, Charles City, James City, Gloucester, Tidewater, Portsmouth, Shenandoah, Prince George, Sussex, New Kent, West End of Richmond, Glen Allen, Federal Court for the Eastern District of Virginia (Richmond, Alexandria, Norfolk, and Newport News Divisions). Continue reading

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Attorney D. Rivera

Virginia Lawyers

Attorney Domingo J. Rivera, MBA, Litigation Specialist (Managing Partner)

Mr. Domingo Rivera is an attorney admitted to practice in Virginia . His unique qualifications and excellent litigation skills and experience combined with his language skills places him in a unique position to be a valuable asset to every client he represents.

Mr. Rivera serves as lead counsel arguing cases in court, filing pleadings, and negotiating settlements. He has presented cases at virtually all levels of the Virginia Courts system from the General District Courts to the Court of Appeals and in the federal courts.

Prior to attending law school, Mr. Rivera completed a B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering, and an M.B.A. He is also fluent in speaking and reading Spanish.

As a commissioned officer in the U.S. Navy, he was entrusted with the responsibility for several complex high-tech projects. One of these projects was the construction of the Homeland Security Headquarters in Virginia , a multi-million dollar state-of-the art facility and one of the most important projects in the Department of Defense. In addition, Mr. Rivera also served as the Assistant Resident Engineer in Charge of Contracts at the Norfolk Naval Station. These positions of trust required Mr. Rivera to maintain a Top Secret Clearance.

Mr. Rivera has been featured as a legal commentator nationally and internationally, including interviews with the BBC with audience of over 130 million people. Mr. Rivera’s cases have been reported in many publications, including the Washington Post and the Mount Vernon News.

When you demand excellence in legal counseling as well aggressive and effective courtroom skills, Mr. Rivera can be your attorney of choice. He can provide you with legal advice, from deciding whether to pursue litigation to the jury trial.

Contact attorney Domingo J. Rivera

Virginia (VA) criminal defense, divorce, child custody, reckless driving, dui and federal court attorney representing clients throughout Virginia. Some of the jurisdictions served include:

Henrico County VA, Richmond City, Chesterfield County VA, Hanover County VA, Petersburg County VA, Fairfax County, Prince William County, Hopewell, Petersburg, Dinwiddie, Quantico, Virginia Beach VA, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Fredericksburg, Stafford, Spotsylvania VA, Hampton Roads, Newport News, Hampton, Williamsburg, Amelia, Powhatan, Goochland, Louisa, Manassas VA, Woodbridge, Charles City, James City, Gloucester, Tidewater, Portsmouth, Shenandoah, Prince George, Sussex, New Kent, West End of Richmond, Glen Allen, Federal Court for the Eastern District of Virginia (Richmond, Alexandria, Norfolk, and Newport News Divisions). Continue reading

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Federal Court Lawyer

Virginia Federal Court Criminal Defense and Virginia Federal Civil Cases

Representing clients in the Virginia federal courts against all federal criminal accusations and in civil matters in the Virginia federal courts. Domingo Rivera has valuable experience handling high-profile federal court cases in Virginia. Mr. Rivera’s cases and commentaries have been reported in the local, National, and even international press.

Litigation in the Virginia Federal Courts, whether related to federal crimes defense or civil cases. requires specialized knowledge and experience. The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, and the Local Rules of the Federal Court of the Eastern District of Virginia are different from the rules applied in the Virginia State courts.

The experience of a Virginia federal court attorney can ensure that your Virginia federal case is properly handled. To illustrate why this is of particular importance, take for example the Federal Court for the Eastern District of Virginia. This court is commonly referred to as the “rocket docket.” A Virginia federal court attorney must be prepared to handle the intensity and demands of the Virginia federal courts.

Our firm is your Virginia Federal crime defense lawyer representing clients accused of the following crimes:

Federal Traffic Cases including reckless driving and drunk driving (DUI).

Federal Drug Crimes including possession, trafficking, distribution, possession for sale, prescription fraud and others.

Federal White Collar Crimes including Bank Fraud, Bankruptcy Fraud, Bribery, Credit Card Fraud, Embezzlement, Securities Fraud, Tax Fraud, Theft Crimes, Auto Theft, Bad Checks, Dealing / Stolen Property, Possession / Stolen Property, Forgery, Grand Larceny / Theft, Petty Larceny / Theft, Shoplifting, Theft by Conversion, and Theft of Services

Federal Computer or Internet Crimes including Criminal Copyright Infringement, Computer Hacking, Computer Fraud, Identity Theft, Internet Stalking, Possession / Distribution / Receipt of child pornography.

When you need a Virginia federal crime defense lawyer, a federal court attorney, a Virginia federal lawyer, or an attorney specializing in Federal court practice, we can assist you with all Virginia federal law matters.

Contact a Virginia Federal crime defense lawyer

Virginia (VA) criminal defense, divorce, child custody, reckless driving, dui and federal court attorney representing clients throughout Virginia. Some of the jurisdictions served include:

Henrico County VA, Richmond City, Chesterfield County VA, Hanover County VA, Petersburg County VA, Fairfax County, Prince William County, Hopewell, Petersburg, Dinwiddie, Quantico, Virginia Beach VA, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Fredericksburg, Stafford, Spotsylvania VA, Hampton Roads, Newport News, Hampton, Williamsburg, Amelia, Powhatan, Goochland, Louisa, Manassas VA, Woodbridge, Charles City, James City, Gloucester, Tidewater, Portsmouth, Shenandoah, Prince George, Sussex, New Kent, West End of Richmond, Glen Allen, Federal Court for the Eastern District of Virginia (Richmond, Alexandria, Norfolk, and Newport News Divisions).

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Virginia Separation Agreement

Virginia Separation Agreement

Under Virginia law, if the husband and wife have signed a separation agreement, the terms are binding on the court. There are however exceptions, for example if the Virginia separation agreement is unconscionable or entered into under duress or diminished capacity, the separation agreement may not be binding Under Virginia law. Additionally, the child custody terms may not bind the court, since the court decides child custody based on the best interests of the child and not necessarily the parents’ wishes. A poorly drafted Virginia separation agreement is sometimes worse than not having an agreement at all! Therefore it is strongly recommended to have a Virginia separation agreement that is drafted by a Virginia lawyer.

A Virginia separation agreement will contain, at an absolute minimum, terms addressing the following matters:

* Distribution of Property: This section of the Virginia separation agreement addresses basic issues, for example who gets the house; who pays the mortgage; who keeps which car; how to handle insurance payments for property; what happens to the bank, retirement, and investment accounts. Before you enter into a Virginia property settlement or separation agreement, you need to be aware of the provisions provided under the law. Know your Virginia rights before contracting them away!
* Child support: In Virginia, child support is awarded pursuant to the Virginia child support guidelines as well as other important considerations. Be aware of the law before entering into a Virginia separation agreement. Remember, under Virginia law, the parents cannot waive the child’s right to be supported by his/her parents.
* Child custody: Should you agree to joint custody, sole custody, or shared custody? How do you address both physical and legal custody? What will be the visitation schedule? How does it compare to what a court would award if the case is litigated? Will the Virginia separation agreement be binding on the court?
* Alimony or spousal support: The terms of a Virginia separation agreement are generally binding on the court. The duration and the amount of spousal support agreed to as part of a Virginia separation agreement has a significant impact on your legal rights.

The Court may incorporate a property settlement agreement between the parties to its Final Decree of Divorce

§ 20-109.1. Affirmation, ratification and incorporation by reference in decree of agreement between parties.

Any court may affirm, ratify and incorporate by reference in its decree dissolving a marriage or decree of divorce whether from the bond of matrimony or from bed and board, or by a separate decree prior to or subsequent to such decree, or in a decree entered in a suit for annulment or separate maintenance, and in a proceeding arising under subsection A 3 or L of § 16.1-241, any valid agreement between the parties, or provisions thereof, concerning the conditions of the maintenance of the parties, or either of them and the care, custody and maintenance of their minor children, or establishing or imposing any other condition or consideration, monetary or nonmonetary. Provisions in such agreements for the modification of child support shall be valid and enforceable. Unless otherwise provided for in such agreement or decree incorporating such agreement, such future modifications shall not require a subsequent court decree. This section shall be subject to the provisions of § 20-108. Where the court affirms, ratifies and incorporates by reference in its decree such agreement or provision thereof, it shall be deemed for all purposes to be a term of the decree, and enforceable in the same manner as any provision of such decree. The provisions of this section shall apply to any decree hereinbefore or hereinafter entered affirming, ratifying and incorporating an agreement as provided herein. Upon the death or remarriage of the spouse receiving support, spousal support shall terminate unless otherwise provided by stipulation or contract. In any case where jurisdiction is obtained over a nonresident defendant by order of publication or by acceptance of service pursuant to § 20-99.1:1, any properly acknowledged and otherwise valid agreement entered into between the parties may be affirmed, ratified and incorporated as provided in this section.

These are only some of the terms of a Virginia separation agreement. Fault grounds, estate rights, forum selection, alternative dispute resolution and many other terms can be included in a Virginia separation agreement. Our Virginia lawyers can provide you with Virginia divorce advice.

Contact a Virginia Divorce and Separation Agreement Lawyer.

Virginia (VA) criminal defense, divorce, child custody, reckless driving, dui and federal court attorney representing clients throughout Virginia. Some of the jurisdictions served include:

Henrico County VA, Richmond City, Chesterfield County VA, Hanover County VA, Petersburg County VA, Fairfax County, Prince William County, Hopewell, Petersburg, Dinwiddie, Quantico, Virginia Beach VA, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Fredericksburg, Stafford, Spotsylvania VA, Hampton Roads, Newport News, Hampton, Williamsburg, Amelia, Powhatan, Goochland, Louisa, Manassas VA, Woodbridge, Charles City, James City, Gloucester, Tidewater, Portsmouth, Shenandoah, Prince George, Sussex, New Kent, West End of Richmond, Glen Allen, Federal Court for the Eastern District of Virginia (Richmond, Alexandria, Norfolk, and Newport News Divisions).

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Virginia Uncontested Divorce

Virginia Uncontested Divorce

To be able to obtain a Virginia uncontested divorce neither the husband nor the wife may assert causes for divorce. In most situations, a written separation agreement is also required.

A Virginia uncontested divorce attorney can assist you through the entire Virginia uncontested divorce proceeding. We offer the option of a flat fee for obtaining an uncontested divorce in Virginia as long as certain requirements are met.

Contact a Virginia uncontested divorce attorney.

Virginia (VA) criminal defense, divorce, child custody, reckless driving, dui and federal court attorney representing clients throughout Virginia. Some of the jurisdictions served include:

Henrico County VA, Richmond City, Chesterfield County VA, Hanover County VA, Petersburg County VA, Fairfax County, Prince William County, Hopewell, Petersburg, Dinwiddie, Quantico, Virginia Beach VA, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Fredericksburg, Stafford, Spotsylvania VA, Hampton Roads, Newport News, Hampton, Williamsburg, Amelia, Powhatan, Goochland, Louisa, Manassas VA, Woodbridge, Charles City, James City, Gloucester, Tidewater, Portsmouth, Shenandoah, Prince George, Sussex, New Kent, West End of Richmond, Glen Allen, Federal Court for the Eastern District of Virginia (Richmond, Alexandria, Norfolk, and Newport News Divisions).
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Virginia Child Support

Virginia Child Support

Under Virginia law, both parents have an absolute duty to support their children. Virginia has enacted child support guidelines that control the award of child support in Virginia. The Virginia child support guidelines consider the combined income of both parents as well as the cost of medical insurance for the children, extraordinary medical expenses, the cost of daycare, and the support being provided for other children.

The Virginia child support guidelines are presumed to provide the correct level of Virginia child support. In Virginia, the court will rarely deviate from the statutory child support guidelines. However, if the court were to deviate from the guidelines, the court would find that the presumption favoring the Virginia child support guidelines has been overcome. The court will apply the following factors to determine whether to deviate from the Virginia child support guidelines:

* Actual monetary support for other children or family members;
* Arrangement regarding custody of children;
* Imputed income to a party who is voluntarily unemployed or voluntarily underemployed
* Debts of either party arising during the marriage for the benefit of the child;
* Debts incurred for the production of income;
* Independent financial resources of the child;
* Earning capacity, obligations and needs, and financial resources of each parent;
* Written agreements between the parties as to amount of child support;
* other relevant considerations.

Virginia allows for the collection of child support through income withholding orders. Additionally, when the amount of support no longer represents the situation of the parties, Virginia courts can modify the amount of support ordered. For additional Virginia child support information and legal advice:

Contact a Virginia child support lawyer

Virginia (VA) criminal defense, divorce, child custody, reckless driving, dui and federal court attorney representing clients throughout Virginia. Some of the jurisdictions served include:

Henrico County VA, Richmond City, Chesterfield County VA, Hanover County VA, Petersburg County VA, Fairfax County, Prince William County, Hopewell, Petersburg, Dinwiddie, Quantico, Virginia Beach VA, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Fredericksburg, Stafford, Spotsylvania VA, Hampton Roads, Newport News, Hampton, Williamsburg, Amelia, Powhatan, Goochland, Louisa, Manassas VA, Woodbridge, Charles City, James City, Gloucester, Tidewater, Portsmouth, Shenandoah, Prince George, Sussex, New Kent, West End of Richmond, Glen Allen, Federal Court for the Eastern District of Virginia (Richmond, Alexandria, Norfolk, and Newport News Divisions).

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Virginia Felony

Virginia Felony

Virginia Felonies are classified as follows:

Class 1 felonies – death, or imprisonment for life and a fine of up to $100,000.

Class 2 felonies – imprisonment for life or a minimum of 20 years and a fine of up to $100,000.

For Class 3 felonies – imprisonment for five to 20 years and a fine of up to $100,000

For Class 4 felonies – imprisonment for two to 10 years and a fine of up to $100,000.

Class 5 felonies – imprisonment for one to 10 years or jail for up to 12 months and a fine of up to $2,500, either or both.

Class 6 felonies – imprisonment for one to five years or jail for up to 12 months and a fine of up to $2,500, either or both.

Some commonly charged felonies in Virginia include:

* Murder
* Malicious wounding
* Armed robbery, grand larceny, and other serious theft crimes
* Possession or distribution of drugs
* Third offense of Domestic assault (3rd offense or greater)
* Felony DWI

Contact a Virginia felony defense lawyer

Virginia (VA) criminal defense, divorce, child custody, reckless driving, dui and federal court attorney representing clients throughout Virginia. Some of the jurisdictions served include:

Henrico County VA, Richmond City, Chesterfield County VA, Hanover County VA, Petersburg County VA, Fairfax County, Prince William County, Hopewell, Petersburg, Dinwiddie, Quantico, Virginia Beach VA, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Fredericksburg, Stafford, Spotsylvania VA, Hampton Roads, Newport News, Hampton, Williamsburg, Amelia, Powhatan, Goochland, Louisa, Manassas VA, Woodbridge, Charles City, James City, Gloucester, Tidewater, Portsmouth, Shenandoah, Prince George, Sussex, New Kent, West End of Richmond, Glen Allen, Federal Court for the Eastern District of Virginia (Richmond, Alexandria, Norfolk, and Newport News Divisions). Continue reading

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Virginia Sex Crimes

Virginia Sex Crimes Defense

A Virginia sex crime defense lawyer can help you to protect your rights if you are accused of a Virginia sex crime. Common Virginia sex crime charges include:

* Rape
* Child Molestation
* Date Rape
* Indecent Exposure
* Sexual Battery
* Solicitation of a Minor
* Spousal Rape
* Statutory Rape
* Possession of Child Pornography

Contact a Virginia sex crime defense lawyer.

Virginia (VA) criminal defense, divorce, child custody, reckless driving, dui and federal court attorney representing clients throughout Virginia. Some of the jurisdictions served include:

Henrico County VA, Richmond City, Chesterfield County VA, Hanover County VA, Petersburg County VA, Fairfax County, Prince William County, Hopewell, Petersburg, Dinwiddie, Quantico, Virginia Beach VA, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Fredericksburg, Stafford, Spotsylvania VA, Hampton Roads, Newport News, Hampton, Williamsburg, Amelia, Powhatan, Goochland, Louisa, Manassas VA, Woodbridge, Charles City, James City, Gloucester, Tidewater, Portsmouth, Shenandoah, Prince George, Sussex, New Kent, West End of Richmond, Glen Allen, Federal Court for the Eastern District of Virginia (Richmond, Alexandria, Norfolk, and Newport News Divisions). Continue reading

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Virginia Theft Crimes

Virginia Theft Crimes Defense

In Virginia you may be charged with one or more of a variety of theft crimes. Perhaps the most common theft crime in Virginia is shoplifting, which is considered as petit larceny if the value of the item is less than $200.00 or grand larceny if the value of the item exceeds $200.00.

As with every criminal prosecution in Virginia, the prosecution must prove the elements of a Virginia theft crime beyond reasonable doubt. We will hold the prosecution to this high standard. Our Virginia theft crime defense attorneys specialize in providing an aggressive defense against the following Virginia theft crimes:

* Petit larceny, also called petty larceny
* Grand larceny
* Shoplifting
* Robbery
* Auto theft / Carjacking
* Burglary
* Embezzlement
* Fraud
* Credit card fraud
* Employee theft
* Money laundering

Petit larceny, also called petty larceny in Virginia

You may be facing charges of petit larceny if you are accused of stealing an item from a person (basically snatching something away from somebody else) if the item is worth less than five dollars. You may also be charged with petit larceny of you are accused of stealing an item without taking item directly from the other person if the value of the item is worth less than two hundred dollars. Petit larceny is a Class one misdemeanor. If the accusation involves taking an item worth more than five dollars from the person or stealing an item worth more than two hundred dollars not directly from the person, the charge will be grand larceny, a felony.

§ 18.2-96. Petit larceny defined; how punished.

Any person who:

1. Commits larceny from the person of another of money or other thing of value of less than $5, or

2. Commits simple larceny not from the person of another of goods and chattels of the value of less than $200, except as provided in subdivision (iii) of § 18.2-95, shall be deemed guilty of petit larceny, which shall be punishable as a Class 1 misdemeanor.

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Grand larceny

Grand larceny is a serious criminal accusation. If you are charged with grand larceny in Virginia, you are facing the possibility of spending up to twenty years in prison. Grand larceny involves taking an item worth more than five dollars from the person or stealing an item worth more than two hundred dollars not directly from the person. If you are convicted of grand larceny in Virginia, the judge or jury has the option of sentencing up to the range of a class one misdemeanor, but in Virginia, you probably will not get such leniency from a jury.

§ 18.2-95. Grand larceny defined; how punished.

Any person who (i) commits larceny from the person of another of money or other thing of value of $5 or more, (ii) commits simple larceny not from the person of another of goods and chattels of the value of $200 or more, or (iii) commits simple larceny not from the person of another of any firearm, regardless of the firearm’s value, shall be guilty of grand larceny, punishable by imprisonment in a state correctional facility for not less than one nor more than twenty years or, in the discretion of the jury or court trying the case without a jury, be confined in jail for a period not exceeding twelve months or fined not more than $2,500, either or both.

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Shoplifting

Shoplifting is a form of larceny and perhaps the most common larceny charge in Virginia. Every day, department stores, specialty stores, electronic shops, and other commercial establishments in Virginia stop people and accuse them of stealing merchandise. Sometimes the accusations arise from innocent placement of merchandise somewhere in a shopping basket with the intention to pay for the item. However, when the person inadvertently forgets to pay for the item, the store in Virginia accuses the person of purposely hiding or concealing the merchandise with the intent to steal it. Sometimes good people make the mistake of falling to the temptation of trying to take an item from a store. Whatever the case may be, a charge of shoplifting, whether petit larceny or grand larceny must be taken seriously and defended against smartly and aggressively.

§ 18.2-103. Concealing or taking possession of merchandise; altering price tags; transferring goods from one container to another; counseling, etc., another in performance of such acts.

Whoever, without authority, with the intention of converting goods or merchandise to his own or another’s use without having paid the full purchase price thereof, or of defrauding the owner of the value of the goods or merchandise, (i) willfully conceals or takes possession of the goods or merchandise of any store or other mercantile establishment, or (ii) alters the price tag or other price marking on such goods or merchandise, or transfers the goods from one container to another, or (iii) counsels, assists, aids or abets another in the performance of any of the above acts, when the value of the goods or merchandise involved in the offense is less than $200, shall be guilty of petit larceny and, when the value of the goods or merchandise involved in the offense is $200 or more, shall be guilty of grand larceny. The willful concealment of goods or merchandise of any store or other mercantile establishment, while still on the premises thereof, shall be prima facie evidence of an intent to convert and defraud the owner thereof out of the value of the goods or merchandise.

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Robbery

§18.2-58. Robbery; How punished.

If any person commit robbery by partial strangulation, or suffocation, or by striking or beating, or by other violence to the person, or by assault or otherwise putting a person in fear of serious bodily harm, or by the threat or presenting of firearms, or other deadly weapon or instrumentality whatsoever, he shall be guilty of a felony and shall be punished by confinement in a state correctional facility for life or any term not less than five years.

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Auto theft / Carjacking

§ 18.2-58.1. Carjacking; penalty A. Any person who commits carjacking, as herein defined, shall be guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for life or a term not less than fifteen years.

B. As used in this section, “carjacking” means the intentional seizure or seizure of control of a motor vehicle of another with intent to permanently or temporarily deprive another in possession or control of the vehicle of that possession or control by means of partial strangulation, or suffocation, or by striking or beating, or by other violence to the person, or by assault or otherwise putting a person in fear of serious bodily harm, or by the threat or presenting of firearms, or other deadly weapon or instrumentality whatsoever. “Motor vehicle” shall have the same meaning as set forth in § 46.2-100.

C. The provisions of this section shall not preclude the applicability of any other provision of the criminal law of the Commonwealth which may apply to any course of conduct which violates this section.

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Burglary

§ 18.2-89. Burglary; how punished.

If any person break and enter the dwelling house of another in the nighttime with intent to commit a felony or any larceny therein, he shall be guilty of burglary, punishable as a Class 3 felony; provided, however, that if such person was armed with a deadly weapon at the time of such entry, he shall be guilty of a Class 2 felony.

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Embezzlement

§ 18.2-111. Embezzlement deemed larceny; indictment. [ Back to top ]

If any person wrongfully and fraudulently use, dispose of, conceal or embezzle any money, bill, note, check, order, draft, bond, receipt, bill of lading or any other personal property, tangible or intangible, which he shall have received for another or for his employer, principal or bailor, or by virtue of his office, trust, or employment, or which shall have been entrusted or delivered to him by another or by any court, corporation or company, he shall be guilty of embezzlement. Proof of embezzlement shall be sufficient to sustain the charge of larceny. Any person convicted hereunder shall be deemed guilty of larceny and may be indicted as for larceny and upon conviction shall be punished as provided in § 18.2-95 or § 18.2-96.

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Fraud [ Back to top ]

Credit card fraud [ Back to top ]

Employee theft [ Back to top ]

Money laundering [ Back to top ]

We investigate Virginia theft charges thoroughly and develop our trial strategy accordingly. As your Virginia theft crime defense lawyer, we will leave no stone unturned when protecting your rights and your freedom.

Contact a Virginia theft crime defense lawyer.

Virginia (VA) criminal defense, divorce, child custody, reckless driving, dui and federal court attorney representing clients throughout Virginia. Some of the jurisdictions served include:

Henrico County VA, Richmond City, Chesterfield County VA, Hanover County VA, Petersburg County VA, Fairfax County, Prince William County, Hopewell, Petersburg, Dinwiddie, Quantico, Virginia Beach VA, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Fredericksburg, Stafford, Spotsylvania VA, Hampton Roads, Newport News, Hampton, Williamsburg, Amelia, Powhatan, Goochland, Louisa, Manassas VA, Woodbridge, Charles City, James City, Gloucester, Tidewater, Portsmouth, Shenandoah, Prince George, Sussex, New Kent, West End of Richmond, Glen Allen, Federal Court for the Eastern District of Virginia (Richmond, Alexandria, Norfolk, and Newport News Divisions). Continue reading

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